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Raytheon’s Space-Based Coastal Monitoring Tech Design Passes Final Review Under NASA Program

Raytheon's Space-Based Coastal Monitoring Tech Design Passes Final Review Under NASA Program thumbnail

Raytheon, an RTX business, has started to develop a space-based coastal monitoring instrument for NASA after completing a critical design review phase.

RTX said Monday the Geostationary Littoral Imaging and Monitoring Radiometer is designed to help researchers gather data on coastal ecosystem conditions and is being built under a contract with the University of New Hampshire.

UNH, the GLIMR project lead, enlisted Raytheon to build the hyperspectral sensor technology after the university won a $107.9 million contract from the space agency four years ago.

NASA expects to send the instrument into geostationary orbit sometime in 2026 or 2027 to generate high-resolution coastal and ocean measurements in the Gulf of Mexico, Amazon River and the southeastern U.S.

Raytheon intends to apply lessons from its work on the GLIMR technology in designing a Geostationary Extended Observations weather satellite for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, as part of a $5.2 million contract from NASA.

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Written by Mary-Louise Hoffman

is a writer of news summaries about executive-level business activity in the government contracting sector. Her reports for ExecutiveBiz are focused on trends and events that drive the GovCon industry to include commercial technologies that private companies are developing for federal government use. She contributes news content to ExecutiveBiz’s sister sites GovCon Wire and ExecutiveGov.

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